Posts tagged ‘seeds’

October 2, 2012

Wild Carrot Seed Spice Cake – Recipe

by Ciaran Burke

Wild Carrot Seed Spice Cake

We have collected quite a bunch of wild carrot seeds from along the bog road that leads to our house. It is a quiet road which does not have much traffic travelling along it. The concave seed heads make them easy to identify and they are quick to pick. Harvest them when dry and remove from the infloresence. Store them in a box in a cool dry place.

Hanna baked a delicious cake using the seeds.

 

Wild Carrot Seed Spice Cake – Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 125g Butter
  • 1 Cup of dark muscavado sugar
  • 1 Egg
  • ½ tsp of baking soda
  • ½ tsp of baking powder
  • 150ml of kefir (or buttermilk)
  • 200ml of wholemeal spelt flour
  • 1/2tsp ground cloves
  • ½ tsp of cried ginger
  • 3tsp of ground wild carrot sed
  • pinch of salt

Method

  1. Melt Butter and sugar
  2. When cooled ad spices and kefir
  3. In a separate bowl mix the flour with soda and baking powder with pinch of salt then whisk in the egg.
  4. Add the flour mix to butter mixture.
  5. Fold in the flour.
  6. Put into cake tin, sprinkle some whole wild carrot seeds over the top and bake at 175 degrees Celcius for about 50 minutes.

Wild Carrot Seed Spice Cake

Kefir is a fermented milk  originating in the North Caucasus region where it was commonly used by shepherds. Traditional kefir was made in animal skin bags that were hung near a doorway where by it would be knocked against by anyone entering, this would ensure that the milk would be mixed well with the kefir grains. The kefir grains are produced during the fermentation process, a small amount of kefir acts as a starter for the next batch. Luckily you don’t have to be a shepherd or have an animal skin bag to have kefir. It is sold in Polish and Eastern European food shops. In the recipe above kefir can be replaced with Buttermilk.

Daucus carota- Wild carrot seed heads on our road

May 19, 2012

The Garden School at Bloom 2012

by Ciaran Burke

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GARDENING IS FOR EVERYONE, YOUNG AND OLD!
WE ARE EXCITED TO BE INVOLVED WITH THE KIDS ZONE AT BLOOM THIS YEAR.
EVERYONE WHO VISITS BLOOM CAN DROP INTO THE GARDEN SCHOOL AND LEARN HOW TO MAKE A POT FROM NEWSPAPER, FILL IT WITH PEAT FREE, ORGANIC COMPOST AND THEN SOW A NASTURTIUM SEED. THEN YOU CAN BRING YOUR POT AND SEED HOME AND WATCH IT GROW.

I am really excited about going to BLOOM this year, more than usual. We have been involved with Ireland’s premier horticulture and food show since it began. The Garden School has been present on the floral pavilion with a display each year, but this year we will be in the Budding Bloomers section, the Kids Zone.

A few years ago we did something similar to this year’s project, making newspaper pots and sowing nasturium seeds. Everyone who visits BLOOM can make a pot and bring it home filled with compost and complete with sown nasturium seed. And it’s FREE!!!

Bloom takes place in the Phoenix Park on Dublin and will feature 25 show gardens, a floral pavilion with lots of plants for sale, a food village and of course lots of things for kids to do too. This year there is free entry for children. Last year BLOOM attracted 90,000 visitors over the bank holiday weekend in June. This year the show will once again be held on the holiday weekend, from Thursday 31st May until Monday 4th June.

Everyone who makes a pot and sows a seed gets a certificate!

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visit The Garden School Website

Visit Bloom family fun page

February 18, 2011

Sowing lettuce seed on my blog

by Ciaran Burke

Spring is here, it is time to get going with growing your own food. On my blog I have been writing about sowing lettuce seed. There is a video too!

http://www.ciaranburke.ie/Ciarans_Website_and_Garden_Blog/Blog/Entries/2011/2/18_Sowing_Lettuce_Seeds.html

June 4, 2010

Two late comers make our day

by Ciaran Burke

“Can we make a pot please”, two tired young faces looked up at me. A little boy with his younger sister were followed by a tired mum, apologising for her children. It was 6.15 pm, fifteen minutes past closing. We were busy tidying up and sweeping our stand after a hectic day showing people how to make paper pots and sow seeds.

Their mother explained that they had been looking for our stand all afternoon. Her children had seen us earlier, it was all they had talked about she said. Their young faces were fillled with hope, how could we refuse.

Hanna went to the storage area to bring the seed, I tipped out compost from the bin and got ready to show the children how to make their pots. They paid attention as I showed them, concentrated hard as they rolled and folded the paper and looked so proud of their completed pots.

“Have you sown a seed before” I asked. Shyly the boy said no, his little sister grinned and shook her head. Enthusiastically they grabbed compost in their hands filling their pots, covering themselves and the floor with compost too. They pushed the seeds into their pots and patted them in. Broad smiles and energy now filled their faces, their mum took pictures and laughed. “Can I being this home?” they boy asked, of course we replied. Their mum asked how much she had to pay, and looked shocked and ecstatic when we said that it was for free.

The mum and her two children thanked us and walked away bouncing with hapiness, the children turning to wave goodbye with their wrapped up pots of nasturtium seeds in their hands. I think that there were only two people happier than the three of them at Bloom at that moment, that was us. We smiled widely, our own tiredness forgotten as we finished tidying our stand. Two children had just sown their first seeds. A perfect end to another great day doing Project Nasturtium at Bloom.

In the pictures below: two past student volunteers on our stand demonstrating how to make pots. The vast majority of people who made pots today were adults, but Project Nasturtium is for everyone. Bottom pic: View of a busy Friday afternoon in the Floral Pavilion from the Penninsula Primulas stand.

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